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UCLA researchers now one step closer to controlled engineering of nanocatalysts

"Currently, some 20 percent of the world's industrial production is based on catalysts — molecules that can quicken the pace of chemical reactions by factors of billions. Oil, pharmaceuticals, plastics and countless other products are made by catalysts.

"Many are hoping to make current catalysts more efficient, resulting in less energy consumption and less pollution. Highly active and selective nanocatalysts, for example, can be used effectively in efforts to break down pollution, create hydrogen fuel cells, store hydrogen and synthesize fine chemicals. The challenge to date has been developing a method for producing nanocatalysts in a controlled, predictable way.

"In a move in this direction, Yu Huang, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and her research team have proposed and demonstrated a new approach to producing nanocrystals with predictable shapes by utilizing surfactants, biomolecules that can bind selectively to certain facets of the crystals' exposed surfaces...."

By Wileen Wong Kromhout

[via newsroom.ucla]

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UCLA, HSSEAS, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
410 Westwood Plaza, 3111 Engineering V
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595
E-mail: yhuang@seas.ucla.edu Tel:(310)794-9589