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To control the composition, shape, and material properties of nanostructures, we utilize biomimetic and chemical technologies that dictate specific faceted growth, creating various and complex nanoparticle shapes and heterostructures.
To control the composition, shape, and material properties of nanostructures, we utilize biomimetic and chemical technologies that dictate specific faceted growth, creating various and complex nanoparticle shapes and heterostructures.
Nanotechnology has become an indispensable element of material engineering for energy related applications, and in particular catalysis. Efficient and effective energy harvesting and storage greatly benefit from advantages of controlling materials at the nanoscale.
Semiconductor electronics and photonics have been the key driving force of the information technology revolution, but are facing substantial challenge for future growth. We are using synthetic chemistry to produce a wide variety of low-dimensional nanostructures, and further assembling them into functional electronic and photonic systems.
Semiconductor electronics and photonics have been the key driving force of the information technology revolution, but are facing substantial challenge for future growth. We are using synthetic chemistry to produce a wide variety of low-dimensional nanostructures, and further assembling them into functional electronic and photonic systems.
In order to probe the underlying principles that govern the way nanocrystals are synthesized, and then further manipulated, we use our expertise in chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and diffusion to find a greater understanding of how these nanostructures are formed, and how we can manipulate them with greater control and more advantageous properties.
Nanotechnology has become an indispensable element of material engineering for energy related applications, and in particular catalysis. Efficient and effective energy harvesting and storage greatly benefit from advantages of controlling materials at the nanoscale.
In order to probe the underlying principles that govern the way nanocrystals are synthesized, and then further manipulated, we use our expertise in chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and diffusion to find a greater understanding of how these nanostructures are formed, and how we can manipulate them with greater control and more advantageous properties.

News

  • The aerogel research published in Science recently has drawn broad attention and been widely reported.

     

  • Titled “Van der Waals Integration Before and Beyond Two-dimensional Materials”, the article was published in the March 20, 2019 issue of the journal. 

     

    As a UCLA professor of chemistry and biochemistry, Prof. Duan is also an Associate Editor for the journalNano Research.  In 2018, Duan was named one of the most influential scientific researchers by Clarivate Analytics.  

  • A new mechanically strong, double-pane ceramic aerogel made from hexagonal boron nitride that is resistant to high temperatures could be used in aerospace and industrial applications. The material, which boasts both a negative Poisson’s ratio and a negative thermal expansion coefficient, is very different to typical ceramic aerogels that are brittle and structurally degrade under thermal shocks.

  • Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Texas at Austin, and Hunan University (China) have recently devised a new method of preparing highly uniform, solution-processable, phase-pure semiconducting nanosheets. Their approach, outlined in a paper published in Nature, involves the electrochemical intercalation of quaternary ammonium molecules into 2-D crystals, followed by a mild sonication and exfoliation process.

  • UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. The advance could lead to much more energy-efficient transistors for electronics and computer chips, diodes for solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and other semiconductor-based devices.

    From newsroom.ucla.edu

Selected Publications:

UCLA, HSSEAS, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
410 Westwood Plaza, 3111 Engineering V
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595
E-mail: yhuang@seas.ucla.edu Tel:(310)794-9589