Welcome to the Huang Lab webpage!

To control the composition, shape, and material properties of nanostructures, we utilize biomimetic and chemical technologies that dictate specific faceted growth, creating various and complex nanoparticle shapes and heterostructures.
To control the composition, shape, and material properties of nanostructures, we utilize biomimetic and chemical technologies that dictate specific faceted growth, creating various and complex nanoparticle shapes and heterostructures.
Nanotechnology has become an indispensable element of material engineering for energy related applications, and in particular catalysis. Efficient and effective energy harvesting and storage greatly benefit from advantages of controlling materials at the nanoscale.
Semiconductor electronics and photonics have been the key driving force of the information technology revolution, but are facing substantial challenge for future growth. We are using synthetic chemistry to produce a wide variety of low-dimensional nanostructures, and further assembling them into functional electronic and photonic systems.
Semiconductor electronics and photonics have been the key driving force of the information technology revolution, but are facing substantial challenge for future growth. We are using synthetic chemistry to produce a wide variety of low-dimensional nanostructures, and further assembling them into functional electronic and photonic systems.
In order to probe the underlying principles that govern the way nanocrystals are synthesized, and then further manipulated, we use our expertise in chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and diffusion to find a greater understanding of how these nanostructures are formed, and how we can manipulate them with greater control and more advantageous properties.
Nanotechnology has become an indispensable element of material engineering for energy related applications, and in particular catalysis. Efficient and effective energy harvesting and storage greatly benefit from advantages of controlling materials at the nanoscale.
In order to probe the underlying principles that govern the way nanocrystals are synthesized, and then further manipulated, we use our expertise in chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and diffusion to find a greater understanding of how these nanostructures are formed, and how we can manipulate them with greater control and more advantageous properties.

News

  • UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. The advance could lead to much more energy-efficient transistors for electronics and computer chips, diodes for solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and other semiconductor-based devices.

    From newsroom.ucla.edu

  • A research team led by UCLA scientists and engineers has developed a method to make new kinds of artificial “superlattices” — materials comprised of alternating layers of ultra-thin “two-dimensional” sheets, which are only one or a few atoms thick. Unlike current state-of-the art superlattices, in which alternating layers have similar atomic structures, and thus similar electronic properties, these alternating layers can have radically different structures, properties and functions, something not previously available.

    From http://newsroom.ucla.edu

  • Researchers in the US and Saudi Arabia are the first to have observed negative transconductance (NTC) inside multilayer molybdenum-disulphide (MoS2) transistors with optimized graphene/metal hybrid contacts. The NTC behaviour comes about thanks to competition between inter-layer charge transport and charge transport through a vertical potential barrier in the MoS2. This unique effect could be exploited for making frequency doublers and phase-shift keying circuits with only one multilayer transistor – something that would greatly simplify circuit design compared to conventional technology, says the team.

    From nanotechweb.org

  • Researchers have developed nanostructures made from a compound of three metals that increases the efficiency and durability of fuel cells while lowering the cost to produce them. Their solution addresses vexing problems that have stalled the adoption of this technology. [via phys.org]

  • The emerging class of two-dimensional layered materials shows breakthrough potential. [via newsroom.ucla and nsf.gov]

Selected Publications:

UCLA, HSSEAS, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
410 Westwood Plaza, 3111 Engineering V
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595
E-mail: yhuang@seas.ucla.edu Tel:(310)794-9589